Buy Issue 25 which is all about Gardens

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Issue 25 “GARDENS” –  Price includes free delivery in the UK

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Description

Buy Issue 25 which is all about Gardens

 

Gardens Issue Content Includes

The gardens wordsearch

A quick history of gardens

Central Park

Using dried flowers as bookmarks

Cacti

Fun facts about gardens

The Garden maze

Germination

Kew Gardens

Designing, planning and planting your own garden

The garden tools wordsearch

Rooftop gardens

Football pitch grass

Rob and Jess talk about trees

A balcony garden

Triple Trouble (fiction) the last chapter in this series)

Quotes about gardens

Quick Quiz about gardens

Back Cover

A Quick History of Gardens

The idea of ‘the garden’ first arose about twelve thousand years ago (in roughly 10,000 BC). They were probably first created in West Asia before appearing in Europe. The word “garden” comes from the Old English word “geard” which means a fence or enclosed space.

As civilisation appeared around the world, outdoor spaces surrounding living areas were mostly used to grow fruit and vegetables. However, wealthy people also used land for decorative ponds and lines of palm trees.

More recently, about 1500 years ago, monasteries in Europe often used garden spaces to grow food, but not just that: they also kept grassy spaces where they could sit and meditate. These were the beginnings of what we might now consider gardens.

Roughly 500 years ago ‘botanical gardens’ began to appear all over Europe. Botanical gardens are especially maintained for the research and display of plants.

One of the most famous gardens in Paris is the “Jardin des Tuileries”, made in 1664. It is next to the equally famous Louvre gallery, where you can see the Mona Lisa.

You may have heard of “Central Park”, the large rectagonal park in the middle of New York City. It is surrounded by tall office buildings and apartments, which have lovely views of the park!

Modern gardens often have a mix of grass, flowers, bushes, and trees.

In England it’s not uncommon to see exotic-looking palm trees, however, they must be the special type that can live through the long, cold English winter.

Similar Issues to Gardens

Extinction

Water

Insects

Senses

Colour

Useful Links

Horticulture (Wikipedia)

Kew gardens (Wikipedia)

Additional information

Weight 0.100 kg
Dimensions 21 × 14.8 × 0.4 cm